UBC Medieval Workshop: 7-8 November 2014

31 October 2014 Comments Off on UBC Medieval Workshop: 7-8 November 2014

Next weekend sees UBC and SFU host the 42nd Annual Medieval Workshop (on Friday 7th and Saturday 8th November).

Most of the conference will be held at Green College, UBC, while the concluding Saturday evening plenary will be held at the SFU Harbour Centre (see program for location addresses and times).

There are two plenary lectures, which all would be especially encouraged to attend:

On Friday 7th November,
from 12pm to 1pm,
in Buchanan A 102, UBC Campus:

  • Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University),
    “Ecolinguistics in Theory and Practice: Premodern Worlds and the Life of Languages”

On Saturday 8th November,
at 5pm, followed by a reception,
in the Joseph and Rosalie Segal Centre, Room 1420-1430, at SFU Harbour Centre in downtown Vancouver:

  • Laurie Shannon (Northwestern University),
    “‘The Fabrick of the Wing’: Minute Bodies and Human Defect, circa 1600’”

REGISTRATION: there is no registration fee, but if you are intending to attend the majority of the workshop, please email Robert Rouse by Tuesday 4th November at (robert.rouse@ubc.ca) so that he can put your name on the attendees list (and have a conference name tag printed). There is no need to RSVP in this manner if you are already on the program as a speaker or a session chair.

The conference program can be accessed from the links below:

http://oecologies.com/2014/10/16/ubc-medieval-workshop-schedule-2014/

http://oecologies.com/conferences-colloquia/

Haijo Westra, 15 October: UPDATE re. location

8 October 2014 Comments Off on Haijo Westra, 15 October: UPDATE re. location

Screen Shot 2014-10-09 at 6.02.40 PMWednesday 15 October, 4:00 p.m., in BUCHANAN PENTHOUSE.

The original post has been updated, including the addition of a poster. Information below serves as a reminder…

The UBC Early Romance Studies Research Cluster

is happy to confirm that

Dr. HAIJO WESTRA (Prof. Emeritus, University of Calgary)

will be speaking on

“PROMOTING CANADA’S RESOURCES TO EUROPEANS IN 1607:
THE POEM  ‘A-DIEU A LA NOUVELLE FRANCE'”

on Wednesday, OCTOBER 15th at 4:00 p.m.
at UBC’s BUCHANAN PENTHOUSE (4th floor of Buchanan Building).

*Abstract*:
The talk will offer an analysis of ‘A-Dieu a la Nouvelle France’, a poem by Marc Lescarbot who spent a year at Port Royal (now Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia). It is really a rhymed prospectus of the country’s resources and an invitation to invest in their exploitation. The aim of the paper will be to elicit the motivation and strategies of representation, focusing in particular on attitudes toward nature and autochthonous peoples, while comparing this text to others like it.

This event is sponsored by the Department of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies and by Saint John’s College.
It will be of interest to faculty and students in the areas of French Literature, History of Canada,  Early Modern Studies, Colonialism, Oecology, among others.

See ATTACHMENT:  Lescarbot’s 1609 map, from the Gutenberg project edition of his History of New France.
Other period maps will be shown during the presentation.

Info: Juliet O’Brien and Chantal Phan, Convenors, UBC Early Romance Studies Research Cluster:
chantal.phan@ubc.ca  and  juliet.obrien@ubc.ca

Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 7.03.11 AM

Cord J. Whitaker: 14 October 2014

7 October 2014 Comments Off on Cord J. Whitaker: 14 October 2014

4:00 p.m.
2080 West Mall, Jack Bell building, room 028

“B(l)ack Home in the Medieval Garden: Time, Space, and Race in Jessie Redmon Fauset’s Medievalism”

Of interest to students and scholars working in Medieval Studies, African American Studies, ecotheory, comparative literature, postcolonial studies, and literary history, criticism and theory more broadly.

ABSTRACT

Jessie Redmon Fauset was the most published woman novelist of the Harlem Renaissance, literary editor of the NAACP’s Crisis, and the editor who discovered Langston Hughes. She was also profoundly interested in the Middle Ages. In this talk, I examine her use of the garden imagery that permeates medieval romance in the short story “My House and a Glimpse of My Life Therein.” Nestling her literary house between a modern cityscape and a verdant medieval forest, Fauset explores what is to be black in twentieth-century America and a student of the ostensibly white Middle Ages. Going beyond the enchanted forest to a medieval garden loaded with literary resonance, Fauset invites her reader to consider whether the Middle Ages are really all that white after all. In “B(l)ack Home,” I consider how Fauset uses the ecology of the garden to turn popular interest in the Middle Ages to her own early twentieth-century racial and political ends.

THE SPEAKER

Dr. Cord J. Whitaker is Assistant Professor of English at Wellesley College and has also served as Chase Faculty Scholar Assistant Professor at the University of New Hampshire. Whitaker’s scholarship and teaching focus on the development of racial ideology in the religious and literary cultures of late medieval England and Europe, and he is currently completing a book on the subject entitled Black Metaphors: Race, Religion, and Rhetoric in the Literature of Late Medieval England. Whitaker has long been fascinated with the literary and cultural history of medieval gardens.

Co-sponsored by UBC English Department and The Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice.

Information above from the GRSSJ website.

Haijo Westra: 15 October 2014: UPDATED

7 October 2014 Comments Off on Haijo Westra: 15 October 2014: UPDATED

Wednesday October 15 2014
4:00 p.m.
Buchanan Penthouse

Haijo Westra: “PROMOTING CANADA’S RESOURCES TO EUROPEANS IN 1607: THE POEM  ‘A-DIEU A LA NOUVELLE FRANCE'”

Dr. Haijo Westra, Prof. Emeritus, University of Calgary, who is well-known to many of you and last contributed a fascinating lecture to our research cluster a couple of years ago, will give a talk on:

“A-Dieu A LA NOUVELLE-FRANCE”, a poem dated 30 July 1607, written by Marc Lescarbot who spent a year at Port Royal (now Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia). This poem is really a rhymed prospectus of the resources of the country and an invitation to invest in their exploitation. The aim of the paper will be to elicit the motivation and the strategies of representation, focusing in particular on the attitudes towards nature and autochthonous peoples, while comparing this text with others like it.

The talk will be in English.

This event is sponsored by the Department of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies and by Saint John’s College.
It will be of interest to faculty and students in the areas of French Literature, History of Canada,  Early Modern Studies, Colonialism, Oecology, among others.

See below:  Lescarbot’s 1609 map, from the Gutenberg project edition of his History of New France.
Other period maps will be shown during the presentation.

Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 7.03.11 AM

Poster (PDF)

repost with change of time: Kim Beauchesne, Fri. 28 March 2014, 5:00 p.m.

23 March 2014 Comments Off on repost with change of time: Kim Beauchesne, Fri. 28 March 2014, 5:00 p.m.

amazon5:00 p.m.
Buchanan Tower 826
***NB change of time***

“Book presentation of Visión periférica: marginalidad y colonialidad en las crónicas de América Latina (siglos XVI-XVII y XX-XXI)

The product of extensive research in specialized archives, Visión periférica challenges linguistic, geographical and temporal boundaries to propose a study of colonial and contemporary chronicles about the marginal regions of Latin America. Initially, Kim Beauchesne’s book focuses on the representation of the colonial periphery —i.e. areas that were neglected by the metropolis, such as the Amazon, the Maranhão and what we now call the Gran Chaco— and analyzes works that were themselves marginalised by literary criticism. Subsequently, the author examines the traces left by such texts in contemporary Latin American chronicles, in order to emphasize the links between the discursive construction of peripheral zones in the 16th and 17th centuries and the forms that this construction adopts in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Dr. Beauchesne’s talk will focus on chapter 3, which explores the vicissitudes of colonial discourse about Equinoctial France in Brazil.

All welcome. In English. Light refreshments will be served.

Dr. Kim Beauchesne is an assistant professor in the Department of French, Hispanic & Italian Studies, UBC. She specializes in Latin American colonial literature and postcolonial theory, with a particular emphasis on comparative colonialism, and was the co-organizer of the UBC Postcolonial Research Cluster. Other research and teaching interests include the notion of cultural hybridity, the relationship between human rights and literature, and the legacy of colonialism in contemporary Latin American literature and culture. She has also co-edited a volume (with Alessandra Santos) entitled The Utopian Impulse in Latin America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).

kim beauchesne

Nexos y Diferencias. Estudios de la Cultura de América Latina, 37.
Madrid/Frankfurt: Iberoamericana/Vervuert Verlag, 2013.
(Image links to publisher’s website)

Kim Beauchesne: Fri. 28 March 2014

21 March 2014 Comments Off on Kim Beauchesne: Fri. 28 March 2014

amazon5:00 p.m.
Buchanan Tower 826
***NB change of time***

“Book presentation of Visión periférica: marginalidad y colonialidad en las crónicas de América Latina (siglos XVI-XVII y XX-XXI)

The product of extensive research in specialized archives, Visión periférica challenges linguistic, geographical and temporal boundaries to propose a study of colonial and contemporary chronicles about the marginal regions of Latin America. Initially, Kim Beauchesne’s book focuses on the representation of the colonial periphery —i.e. areas that were neglected by the metropolis, such as the Amazon, the Maranhão and what we now call the Gran Chaco— and analyzes works that were themselves marginalised by literary criticism. Subsequently, the author examines the traces left by such texts in contemporary Latin American chronicles, in order to emphasize the links between the discursive construction of peripheral zones in the 16th and 17th centuries and the forms that this construction adopts in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Dr. Beauchesne’s talk will focus on chapter 3, which explores the vicissitudes of colonial discourse about Equinoctial France in Brazil.

All welcome. In English. Light refreshments will be served.

Dr. Kim Beauchesne is an assistant professor in the Department of French, Hispanic & Italian Studies, UBC. She specializes in Latin American colonial literature and postcolonial theory, with a particular emphasis on comparative colonialism, and was the co-organizer of the UBC Postcolonial Research Cluster. Other research and teaching interests include the notion of cultural hybridity, the relationship between human rights and literature, and the legacy of colonialism in contemporary Latin American literature and culture. She has also co-edited a volume (with Alessandra Santos) entitled The Utopian Impulse in Latin America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).

kim beauchesne

Nexos y Diferencias. Estudios de la Cultura de América Latina, 37.
Madrid/Frankfurt: Iberoamericana/Vervuert Verlag, 2013.
(Image links to publisher’s website)

Leslie Zarker Morgan: Thurs. 6 March 2014

3 March 2014 Comments Off on Leslie Zarker Morgan: Thurs. 6 March 2014

geste francorThe UBC Medieval Studies Program is happy to present:

A talk by

LESLIE ZARKER MORGAN (Loyola University)

“The ‘Roman d’Alexandre’ and ‘Huon d’Auvergne’: A Fourteenth-Century Franco-Italian Epic and the Alexander Model”

Dr. Leslie Zarker Morgan is a well-known medievalist with a special interest in Franco-Italian relations in the Medieval and Renaissance epic. Her lecture will be about her current research project, the goal of which is the production of an on-line edition and translation of the last unpublished Franco-Italian work.

She has previously published La Geste Francor: Chansons de geste of Ms. Marc. Fr. XIII (256), edition with glossary, introduction and notes. 2 vol. Arizona: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 2009.  Dr. Zarker Morgan is Professor of Italian and French at Loyola University, in Baltimore, Maryland.

THURSDAY, MARCH 6th, 12:30
Buchanan Building
Room B-213

Everyone is welcome!

Info: chantal.phan@ubc.ca

UPDATE: Louisa Mackenzie talk today CANCELLED

29 January 2014 Comments Off on UPDATE: Louisa Mackenzie talk today CANCELLED

More information at Oecologies

site updates

11 January 2014 Comments Off on site updates

The following pages have been updated:

Louisa Mackenzie: 29 January 2014

11 January 2014 Comments Off on Louisa Mackenzie: 29 January 2014

UPDATE: CANCELLED

Oecologies Speaker Series

Wednesday, January 29
5:00pm – 6:30pm

Coach House, Green College, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road, UBC (map)

Louisa Mackenzie (French and Italian Studies, University of Washington),
“Don’t Panic: The Unknowability of Early Modern Nature”

Summary: The use of the word “nature” in this talk’s title deliberately and anachronistically references a post-Romantic ideal of a non-human world absolutely beyond culture, including what we now call wilderness. Contemporary environmental thinking, especially in Anglophone contexts, often holds that experiencing wild(er)ness is restorative, even spiritually enriching. Many scholars have started to question the assumptions and to reveal the privileges that make this ideal thinkable: I will argue that early modern cultures can help us further these critiques. Working with texts from sixteenth-century France, in particular the long “scientific poem” La Savoie by Jacques Peletier which describes the landscapes of this mountainous and often wild part of France, I will show that early modern mentalities considered wildness to be not just frightening but literally unrepresentable by human knowledge systems. Wild areas, like unmitigated contact with the divine, inspired a kind of epistemological panic. This reminds us that the etymology of the word panic, from the Greek πανικός pertaining to Pan the god of wild places, gestures towards the fear inspired by environments devoid of human activity, and perhaps invites us to a more humble appraisal of the limits of our cognition of the non-human.

Louisa MackenzieSpeaker information: Louisa Mackenzie is Associate Professor of French at the University of Washington. Her research focus is primarily on early modern French culture, which she reads through various contemporary critical lenses including ecocriticism and, more recently, animal studies. Her book The Poetry of Place: Lyric, Landscape and Ideology in Renaissance France (University of Toronto Press, 2010) is an interdisciplinary study of how a subjective and affective sense of place was produced by poetry in dialogue with cartography, land use history and other knowledge spheres. She is currently starting a book-length project on animals as “queer bodies of knowledge” in 16th-century France.

Oecologies Speaker Series

The Oecologies Speaker Series gathers scholars from the humanities living and working along the North American Pacific coast to investigate the idea of “oecology,” an older spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” We retain this defamiliarizing spelling because our speakers have been asked to talk about how we might rethink “ecology” through the study of premodern natural history, taxonomy, hierarchy, and categorization. By exploring an array of discourses about “oecology,” our series asks what conceptual or metaphorical resources might help us – as located moderns – reorient our perceptions about the premodern past and our present and future moments. Among other matters, speakers will discuss the relations among terms such as N/nature, landscape, ecology, economy, environment, and technology, and will ask how our regionally and temporally specific conceptions draw / differ from premodern inhabitations of the world.

GreenCollege_Logo_wTagline_CMYK_2013hThe Speaker Series, which is generously sponsored by Green College at the University of British Columbia, takes place approximately once per month. See below for dates and details. Also see the event poster, the Oecologies Calendar, the Green College Calendar of Events, and the Green College Spotlight. Oecologies also holds a reading group in advance of each talk in the Speaker Series. If you are interested in attending, please contact Dr. Robert Rouse. If you have other questions about this series, please contact Carmel Ohman.