Call for Papers: Occitan literature at the MLA (January 2017, deadline for proposals 20 March 2016)

14 March 2016 Comments Off on Call for Papers: Occitan literature at the MLA (January 2017, deadline for proposals 20 March 2016)

MLA CFP DEADLINE 20 MARCH
 
1. Boundary Conditions and Troubadour Texts
What boundary conditions define troubadour texts? How do politics, genre, dialect/language, and country of origin determine critical approaches to the troubadours? Do scholars read Italian and Catalan troubadours the same way as Occitan ones? How do manuscript transmission and nationality define the field?
 
The MLA Occitan Language, Literature, and Culture Forum is calling for abstracts (250 words or less) for 15-20 minute papers that examine the troubadours within the context of the 2017 Presidential Theme: Boundary Conditions: https://news.commons.mla.org/2015/12/30/2017-presidential-theme-boundary-conditions/
 
Please send abstracts or enquiries to Courtney Wells (wells@hws.edu) by March 20, 2016.
 
2. Sound(s) of French and Occitan Lyric
 
Music, sound, noise, silence; performed lyric–historical/ represented, actual/imagined; sonorities evoked by lyrics –human, avian, animal, inanimate–or by manuscript contexts; lyric silences/silencing lyric.
The MLA Medieval French and Occitan LLC Forums are calling for abstracts (250 words or less) for a joint session of 5 speakers
Please send abstracts of 250 words or less to Sarah Kay at hsk8@nyu.edu.
Additional enquiries may be sent to wells@hws.edu or ddelogu@uchicago.edu
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Kwame Anthony Appiah, the 2017 MLA president, has chosen Boundary Conditions as the presidential theme for the 2017 convention, which will be held in Philadelphia. Boundary conditions are, for mathematicians, the parameters that define the space in which one seeks solutions. So the theme offers, first, an invitation to reflect together on the parameters that determine our work. Our boundary conditions are sometimes spatial, sometimes identitarian, sometimes disciplinary and subdisciplinary, and boundaries themselves are sites of artistic production and of scholarship. As students of language and literature increasingly cross national boundaries, physically and virtually, we face new questions about composition and critical analysis, second-language pedagogy, translation, and the ideas of global literature and transnational cultural studies. How do our new boundary conditions affect our understanding of the projects of literary and cultural studies? How do new forms of communication—online education, digital libraries, blogs, hypertext, machine translation, social media, and new tools of textual analysis—reshape the boundary conditions of our work? And how are these boundary conditions affected by the new material circumstances in our universities—the growth of the precariat, challenges from opponents of liberal education, clashing conceptions of freedom of expression? Visit the MLA Web site to post a call for papers for the 2017 convention.
 

CFP: 2016 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE MEDIEVAL ACADEMY OF AMERICA (Boston, MA; February 25-27, 2016)

12 January 2015 Comments Off on CFP: 2016 ANNUAL MEETING OF THE MEDIEVAL ACADEMY OF AMERICA (Boston, MA; February 25-27, 2016)

DEADLINE: 1 MAY 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Program Committee invites proposals for papers on all topics and in all disciplines and periods of medieval studies. Any member of the Medieval Academy may submit a paper proposal, excepting those who presented papers at the annual meetings of the Medieval Academy in 2014 or 2015; others may submit proposals as well but must become members in order to present papers at the meeting. Special consideration will be given to individuals whose field would not normally involve membership in the Medieval Academy.

Location:
Boston is home to numerous universities, art museums, and performing arts companies. Hosted by several Boston-area institutions, the meeting will convene at the Hyatt, across the street from the renovated Opera House and in the heart of Boston’s theater district. The final reception will be held at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

Theme(s):
Rather than an overarching theme, the 2016 meeting will provide a variety of thematic connections among sessions. The Medieval Academy welcomes innovative sessions that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries or that use various disciplinary approaches to examine an individual topic. To both facilitate and emphasize interdisciplinarity, the Call for Papers is organized in “threads.” Sessions listed under these threads have been proposed to or by the Program Committee but the list provided below is not meant to be exhaustive or exclusive.

Proposals:
Individuals may propose to offer a paper in one of the sessions below, a full panel of papers and speakers for a listed session, a full panel of papers and speakers for a session they wish to create, or a single paper not designated for a specific session. Sessions usually consist of three 25-minute papers, and proposals should be geared to that length, although the committee is interested in other formats as well (poster sessions, digital experiences, etc). The Program Committee may choose a different format for some sessions after the proposals have been reviewed.

Deadline:
1 May 2015

The complete Call for Papers with additional information, submission procedures, selections guidelines, and organizers is available here:
http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/medievalacademy.site-ym.com/resource/resmgr/pdfs/MAA2016CFP.pdf

Please contact the Program Committee at
MAA2016@TheMedievalAcademy.org
with any questions.

THREADS:

CAROLINGIAN WORLDS

  • “Contacts with Islam”
  • “Frontiers”
  • “Transformations, 877-987”

THE ELEVENTH CENTURY

  • “The 1000th Anniversary of Cnut the Great (1016/2016)”
  • “Art and Architecture in the Eleventh Century: An Age of Experiments”
  • “Creative Liturgies in the Eleventh Century”

MONASTICISMS

  • “Monastic Visual Cultures”
  • “Monastic Identities”
  • “Ascetic Bodies in the Late Middle Ages”

LYRIC TRANSFORMATIONS

  • “The ‘Lyric’ Dante”
  • “Poetic Form”
  • “Petrarch between the Vernacular and Latin”

GREEN WORLDS/MEDIEVAL ECOLOGIES

  • “Garden, Park, Wasteland”
  • “Material Ecologies”
  • “Medieval Anthropocenes”
  • “Water Worlds and Seascapes”
  • “Mediterranean Landscapes”

WORKS: UNFINISHED, TRANSFORMED OR IN RUINS

  • “Unfinished Books, Incomplete Texts”
  • “Medieval Art and Architecture as Work(s) in Progress”
  • “Ruins”

MEDIEVAL STUDIES AND THE DIGITAL HUMANITIES

Papers are invited for a thread devoted to the exciting new ways in which medieval studies and digital humanities intersect. Topics might include (but are not limited to)

  • issues of visualization and the re-presentation of
    medieval spaces,
  • soundscapes,
  • the implications of digital archives for the
    editing of medieval texts,
  • the digital (re)construction of medieval collections and libraries,
  • GIS and mapping projects,
  • social network  analysis,
  • text encoding,
  • and computational approaches to texts and scribal
    behaviors.

SESSIONS:

  • “800th Anniversary of the Dominican Order”
  • “800th Anniversary of Pope Innocent III’s Death”
  • “Mortality / Facing Death”
  • “Margins of War”
  • “Images of Coercion and Dissent”
  • “Dangerous, Deviant, and Disobedient Women in the Middle Ages”
  • “Vernacular Exegesis”
  • “Drama/Performance”
  • “Literature of Pastoral Care”
  • “Boston Area Medieval Manuscripts”

The Medieval Academy of America | 17 Dunster St., Suite 202 | Cambridge | MA | 02138

2nd CFP with deadline extension: UBC Medieval Workshop (9-10 October 2015)

12 January 2015 Comments Off on 2nd CFP with deadline extension: UBC Medieval Workshop (9-10 October 2015)

Here is the second call for papers for the October 2015 UBC Medieval
Workshop, held jointly with the Gregorian Institute of Canada.

Theme:
Liturgical and Secular Drama in Medieval Europe: Text, Music, Image (ca.
1000-1500).

NEW DEADLINE: 15 FEBRUARY 2015

Please note the new conference dates and extended deadline for submissions.

Second call for papers

*Please note new dates and extended submission deadline.

The Gregorian Institute of Canada and The University of British Columbia’s Medieval Studies Committee

invite paper and session proposals for

THE 43rd UBC MEDIEVAL WORKSHOP / THE 10th GIC COLLOQUIUM, a joint interdisciplinary research conference:

Liturgical and Secular Drama in Medieval Europe: Text, Music, Image (c. 1000-1500)

Taking place at Green College, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, on OCTOBER 9-10, 2015.

This conference will focus on the Medieval segment of the long history of European theatre. One objective will be to analyze aspects of the great repertoire of liturgical drama, from its supposed modest beginnings in the Gregorian liturgy of Easter, through its various developments in Latin and the vernaculars, into liturgical, semi-liturgical and secular plays. Just as importantly we recognize the fact that European drama did not begin in the Medieval church. When one considers the secular themes appearing in semi-religious plays then in comic genres of the late Middle Ages, such as the farce, it often becomes necessary to study the direct or indirect influence of secular sources such as Latin comedies, Medieval French fabliaux, or the troubadours’ satirical dialogues. Beyond this intertextuality, combined in many cases with musical exchanges, Medieval drama gradually acquired visual components including manuscript illuminations, props, theatrical machines, sets, and different approaches to spatial organization in relation to the audience. The transformations in drama over the period 1000-1500 are connected to evolving attitudes toward music in the church, music in theatre, spoken vs. sung plays, the place of the actor in society, religious and secular themes, interactions with other genres, and the manuscript tradition (notations, text transmission, stage directions and commentaries).

Given the diverse aspects of this conference theme, we hope to receive paper and session proposals in: historical musicology, theatre studies, history, performance studies, philosophy, religious studies, translation studies, art history, palaeography and edition. We particularly invite contributions involving two or more of these disciplines.

Proposals for 20-minute papers or 3-paper sessions, in English or in French, should be submitted by FEBRUARY 15, 2015, addressed to

James Blasina and Chantal Phan

2015 GIC/UBCMW

and sent by email to:

jblasina-at-fas-dot-harvard-dot-edu and chantal-dot-phan-at-ubc-dot-ca

or by mail or fax to:

Prof. Chantal Phan (Medieval Studies), FHIS, 797-1873 East Mall, VANCOUVER, BC V6T 1Z1, CANADA. Fax: (1)-604-822-6675

CFP: 2015 UBC Medieval Workshop (9-11 October2015)

7 December 2014 Comments Off on CFP: 2015 UBC Medieval Workshop (9-11 October2015)

DEADLINE: 31 December 2014

Second Call for Papers for the 2015 UBC Medieval Workshop / 10th Colloquium of the Gregorian Institute of Canada

Theme:
LITURGICAL AND SECULAR DRAMA IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE: TEXT, MUSIC, IMAGE (c.1000-c.1500)

Keynote Speaker: Professor Susan Boynton (Columbia University)

Place: Green College, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Dates of conference: October 9-11, 2015

Please see the attachment [=image below] for details.
English cfp: GIC-UBCMW 2015

*Deadline for abstracts: December 31, 2014*

Contacts:
James Blasina jblasina@fas.harvard.edu
Chantal Phan chantal.phan@ubc.ca

IMG_0583.PNG

CFP Extended Deadline! 42nd UBC Medieval Workshop: Medieval and Renaissance Oecologies

1 January 2014 Comments Off on CFP Extended Deadline! 42nd UBC Medieval Workshop: Medieval and Renaissance Oecologies

OecologiesDownload the call for papers (CFP)

Call for Papers *extended deadline*: 1 February 2014

Workshop dates: 7-9 November 2014

The Œcologies Project, along with the Committee for Medieval Studies at the University of British Columbia, solicits contributors for the 42nd annual UBC workshop, to be held from 7-9 November 2014 at Green College, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

Medieval and Renaissance Œcologies seeks to interrogate premodern understandings of the natural world and ecological thinking. A prevailing attitude within modern Western culture has imagined the natural world as “out there,” a distinct realm upon which humans import subjective meaning. More recently, ecocritics and theorists of the new materialism(s) have challenged this conception of nature. This workshop takes up these challenges by investigating the idea of “œcology,” an older and defamiliarizing spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” The spelling is retained in an effort to rethink “ecology” through the study of premodern natural history, taxonomy, hierarchy, and categorization, and to ask what conceptual or metaphorical resources might help us – as located moderns – reorient our perceptions about the premodern past and our present and future moments. In an effort to define complex terms such as “environment,” “landscape,” and “ecology,” we ask where do these terms come from? What came before them? What do they mean here and now? What did conceptions of Nature and “œcology” look like in the Medieval and Renaissance periods and how did different discourse communities define their meanings?

We welcome papers from any discipline, and especially encourage interdisciplinary approaches. Please send paper proposals, questions, and / or expressions of interest to:

Vin Nardizzi or Robert Rouse by 1 February 2014.

This conference is part of the ongoing multi-year research project Œcologies (oecologies.com), supported by the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University.

CFP: 42nd UBC Medieval Workshop

27 November 2013 Comments Off on CFP: 42nd UBC Medieval Workshop

The next Medieval Workshop: Medieval and Renaissance Oecologies

OecologiesDownload the call for papers (CFP)

Call for papers (CFP) deadline: 1 February 2014

Workshop dates: 7-9 November 2014

The Œcologies Project, along with the Committee for Medieval Studies at the University of British Columbia, solicits contributors for the 42nd annual UBC workshop, to be held from 7-9 November 2014 at Green College, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

Medieval and Renaissance Œcologies seeks to interrogate premodern understandings of the natural world and ecological thinking. A prevailing attitude within modern Western culture has imagined the natural world as “out there,” a distinct realm upon which humans import subjective meaning. More recently, ecocritics and theorists of the new materialism(s) have challenged this conception of nature. This workshop takes up these challenges by investigating the idea of “œcology,” an older and defamiliarizing spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” The spelling is retained in an effort to rethink “ecology” through the study of premodern natural history, taxonomy, hierarchy, and categorization, and to ask what conceptual or metaphorical resources might help us – as located moderns – reorient our perceptions about the premodern past and our present and future moments. In an effort to define complex terms such as “environment,” “landscape,” and “ecology,” we ask where do these terms come from? What came before them? What do they mean here and now? What did conceptions of Nature and “œcology” look like in the Medieval and Renaissance periods and how did different discourse communities define their meanings?

We welcome papers from any discipline, and especially encourage interdisciplinary approaches. Please send paper proposals, questions, and / or expressions of interest to: Vin Nardizzi or Robert Rouse by 1 February 2014.

œcologies
Oecologies: Inhabiting Premodern Worlds
is a research cluster that gathers scholars from the humanities living and working along the North American Pacific coast to investigate the idea of “oecology,” an older spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” We retain this defamiliarizing spelling because our research asks how we might rethink “ecology” through the study of premodern natural history, taxonomy, hierarchy, and categorization. By exploring an array of discourses about “oecology,” our research asks what conceptual or metaphorical resources might help us – as located moderns – reorient our perceptions about the premodern past and our present and future moments. Among other matters, our research will discuss the relations among terms such as N/nature, landscape, ecology, economy, environment, and technology, and will ask how our regionally and temporally specific conceptions draw / differ from premodern inhabitations of the world.

Principal Collaborators

Vin Nardizzi (Associate Professor, English, University of British Columbia) teaches Renaissance literature, ecocriticism, and queer and disability studies.

Tiffany Werth (Associate Professor, English, Simon Fraser University) teaches the English Reformations, romance in all its forms, and is currently researching early modern habits of taxonomy and all things mineral.

Patricia Badir (Professor, English, University of British Columbia) teaches Renaissance literature, and is currently working on playmaking and the perils of mimesis on Shakespeare’s stage.

Robert Rouse (Associate Professor, English, University of British Columbia) teaches Medieval literature. His research has been primarily concerned with medieval romance and culture.

Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (Puerto Rico, October 2013)

24 January 2013 Comments Off on Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (Puerto Rico, October 2013)

Main deadline: 15 March 2013
See also: Some calls for papers: deadlines in January-April 2013
Some panel organizers are looking for papers to complete their panels: deadlines may be earlier … « Read the rest of this entry »

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